April 18, 2014
"Paul’s repeated emphasis on freedom — that we who are freed by Jesus’s cross-and-resurrection are no longer slaves but sons — gets him into repeated trouble. He receives grim reports of his converts among the Galatians, a Celtic tribe settled in Asia Minor between the Mediterranean and the Black Sea and who like all Celts were extremists — and hardly experts in subtle distinctions. So Paul finds he must advise them that their new freedom doesn’t really include attending ‘orgies and such things,’ which are only occasions for relinquishing one’s newfound freedom and putting oneself under the power of heedless passions. Under the heading of ‘such things’ Paul includes a laundry list of favorite Galatian pastimes, ‘whoring…idolatry and witchcraft…faction-fighting and malice, drunkenness.’ Sounds like the Celts, all right."

— Thomas Cahill, Desire of the Everlasting Hills

5:25pm
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 15, 2014
"

The forbearing use of power does not only form a touchstone, but the manner in which an individual enjoys certain advantages over others is a test of a true gentleman.

The power which the strong have over the weak, the employer over the employed, the educated over the unlettered, the experienced over the confiding, even the clever over the silly—the forbearing or inoffensive use of all this power or authority, or a total abstinence from it when the case admits it, will show the gentleman in a plain light

The gentleman does not needlessly and unnecessarily remind an offender of a wrong he may have committed against him. He cannot only forgive, he can forget; and he strives for that nobleness of self and mildness of character which impart sufficient strength to let the past be but the past. A true man of honor feels humbled himself when he cannot help humbling others.

"

General Lee (via jarthurbloom)

(via vikingmanx)

6:29pm
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 15, 2014
"The prime anti-Western fantasy for our age, however, was expressed by Nietzsche. Two years after hearing the piano score of Wagner’s epoch-making opera Tristan and Isolde, Nietzsche made a lifelong commitment to sexual revolution by deliberately infecting himself with syphilis in a Leipzig brothel. Thomas Mann saw in that gesture an act of ‘demonic consecration.’ Whatever the motivation, Nietzsche was outraged when Wagner had second thoughts. When Wagner ‘prostrated himself before the cross’ by writing Parsifal, Nietzsche flew into a rage against not only Wagner but against German music and all of Europe as well. Turning his disease-damaged eyes southward he began to discern what he termed the ‘lewd melancholy’ across the Mediterranean. As an antidote to Wagner’s prostration before the cross, Nietzsche discovered Africa. ‘This music,’ Nietzsche writes, describing his impression of Bizet’s Carmen,

is lively, but its liveliness is neither French nor German. Its liveliness is African. It has this destiny; its happiness is short, sudden, and without pardon… And how this moorish dance speaks to us so tranquilly! How even our insatiability learns satiety from its lewd melancholy! Finally we have a love that has been transposed back to nature. Not the love of some ‘higher virgin’! No sentimentality! Rather love as fate, as fatality, cynical, without guilt, cruel — as a result just like nature. That love which is war in its means, and at its basis the deadly hatred of the sexes.

The attraction here is obviously sexual. Africa was now to fulfill the unfulfilled promise of sexual liberation that Nietzsche first heard in Tristan and Isolde. Nietzsche was not alone in expressing this desire. Jung found himself drawn to Africa for precisely the same reasons. Africa was ‘where I longed to be: in a non-European country where no European language was spoken and no Christian conceptions prevailed…’ It was a place amenable to the desire of certain Europeans for release from what they considered the burden of the moral law, especially sexual morality. Margaret Mead discovered the same thing in Samoa. She told the liberated ladies at Barnard in the 1920s just what they wanted to hear, namely, that in the state of nature people didn’t take adultery seriously. For lack of a better name, we will call this intellectual construct Blue Lagoon anthropology. It and its variants have been the deepest aspiration of modern intellectuals."

— E. Michael Jones, Degenerate Moderns

8:05am
  
Filed under: Quotes 
April 14, 2014
Sweden is the EU country that receives the most asylum seekers.

Sweden is the EU country that receives the most asylum seekers from third world countries relative to their population. Meanwhile, the government announced that immigration must increase even more.

According to Eurostat’s latest report, the total number of people seeking asylum in the EU increased sharply last year. Between 2008 and 2013 the number of asylum seekers increased from 225,000 to 435,000.

And Sweden had the biggest increase of all. After the government decided that all Syrians who get to Sweden illegally should automatically get permanent residency immigration to Sweden reached historic levels in 2013.

54,000 asylum seekers came to Sweden in 2013. The only EU countries that received more were France (65,000 asylum seekers) and Germany (127,000 asylum seekers) – two countries with populations that are seven and nine times larger than the Sweden.

[…]

In the spring budget Prime Minister Reinfeldt proposes that the appropriation for the “migration” in 2014 will increase by 2.7 billion to 12.6 billion

April 13, 2014
"A reliable way to make people believe in falsehoods is frequent repetition, because familiarity is not easily distinguished from truth."

— Daniel Kahneman, Thinking, Fast and Slow (via fallofbabylon)

2:18pm
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 13, 2014

Top two manliest priests:

1. Archbishop Kliment of Simferopol.
2. Fedor Emelianenko’s priest. Unsure of his name.

April 11, 2014
"An heir finds the title-deeds of his house. Will he say, ‘Perhaps they are forged’ and neglect to examine them?"

— Blaise Pascal, Pensées

12:01pm
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 11, 2014
"How comes it that a cripple does not offend us, but that a fool does? Because a cripple recognises that we walk straight, whereas a fool declares that it is we who are silly; if it were not so, we should feel pity and not anger."

— Blaise Pascal, Pensées

6:00am
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 10, 2014
The Unified Field Theory of Madness

A fantastic essay by John C. Wright on the madness of modern leftism. I highly recommend everyone to read it.

———————————————————————-

"The theory holds that all we know is irredeemably distorted by our racial make-up, history, class interests, and psychological shortcomings; hence all knowledge is merely bigotry in disguise. To make a judgment between virtue and vice is vile bigotry in disguise; and to make a judgment that one society is better than another is vile racism in disguise. And bigotry or racism is a hate-crime. Discrimination is a hate-crime."

[…]

"They have taken a whole area of human thought, namely, everything embraces in ethics, politics, morals, economics and history, and declared it all sacred, off limits, and forbidden to be thought about. In the memorable phrase of Sayet, they have defined reasoning as a hate crime. By their theory, no fact and no conclusions of common sense are neutral. All are tainted by the original sin of bias and bigotry. The act of bringing up a fact is never, never an act done in the impersonal pursuit of truth. For them there is no truth, and even if there were, there is no impartiality. The act of bringing up a fact is always an act of aggression, an imposition, if not an attack."

[…]

"If they were truly motivated by a true desire to help the poor, they would look at facts and evidence, see what actually helped the poor and what actually harmed them, and they would select the helpful and avoid the harmful. But instead what happens is that, since they live in a world without cause and effect, they are unwilling and unable to make any judgment about what actually harms and actually helps. Making such a judgment, remember, in their minds is bigotry, the one sin to be avoided at all costs. Hence, they can only judge by good intentions. Results do not matter."

[…]

"If life is a game of pure chance, then the winners of life, the happy people, the rich, the famous, the saintly, all of them must have somehow rigged or twisted the institutions, laws and customs, and all the rules of life to their own advantage. Since all property is theft, all property owners are thieves. Hence, all life’s winners, heroes and captains of industry and saints and famous artists, everyone worthy of admiration for any reason, all of them, all the winners, the theory demands they be nothing but outrageous cheats. Also, they must be outrageous liars for denying that they are cheats. Worse, they are all con men for deceiving their victims into playing. The logic applies to wealth as well as to power and virtue, including such things as applause and glory and dignity. Hence, combined with the pathological and neurotic smug self-sanctimony, the Leftist, as long as he be true his theory, must demean whatever is worthy, true, successful, and good, and reward and praise whatever is unworthy, untrue, unsuccessful, and bad."

April 10, 2014
"It is natural for the mind to believe and for the will to love; so that, for want of true objects, they must attach themselves to false."

— Blaise Pascal, Pensées

6:04pm
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 9, 2014
"

We do not rest satisfied with the present. We anticipate the future as too slow in coming, as if in order to hasten its course; or we recall the past, to stop its too rapid flight. So imprudent are we that we wander in the times which are not ours and do not think of the only one which belongs to us; and so idle are we that we dream of those times which are no more and thoughtlessly overlook that which alone exists.

For the present is generally painful to us. We conceal it from our sight, because it troubles us; and, if it be delightful to us, we regret to see it pass away. We try to sustain it by the future and think of arranging matters which are not in our power, for a time which we have no certainty of reaching.

Let each one examine his thoughts, and he will find them all occupied with the past and the future. We scarcely ever think of the present; and if we think of it, it is only to take light from it to arrange the future.

The present is never our end. The past and the present are our means; the future alone is our end. So we never live, but we hope to live; and, as we are always preparing to be happy, it is inevitable we should never be so.

"

— Blaise Pascal, Pensées

12:01pm
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 9, 2014
"The Greeks were, as far as we know, the most beautiful race which the world ever saw. Every educated man knows that they were the cleverest of all nations, and, next to his Bible, thanks God for Greek literature. Now the Greeks had made physical, as well as intellectual education a science as well as a study. Their women practised graceful, and in some cases even athletic exercises. They developed, by a free and healthy life, those figures which remain everlasting and unapproachable models of human beauty."

— Charles Kingsley, Lecture on Thrift (1869)

6:00am
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 8, 2014
Millennials Consume Content Every Waking Hour (And Then Some)

Millennials are giving new meaning to the “always-on” consumer because they are on even when they are supposed to be off.

Millennials are apparently spending 18 hours per day consuming media. The hours are compounded, meaning that a person watching TV and checking Instagram at the same time for one hour would rack up two hours of media consumption — one for each device. That’s according to new research from Crowdtap, a social analytics platform.

7:09pm
  
Filed under: Brainwashing 
April 8, 2014
"Too much and too little wine. Give him none, he cannot find truth; give him too much, the same."

— Blaise Pascal, Pensées

6:39pm
  
Filed under: quotes 
April 7, 2014
Art of Manliness Podcast Episode #60: The Way of the SEAL With Mark Divine

In this episode of the Art of Manliness podcast I talk to Mark Divine, owner of SEALFIT and the author of the new book, The Way of the SEAL: Think Like an Elite Warrior to Lead and Succeed. Mark and I discuss his service as a SEAL, how he’s helped potential SEALs get ready for BUD/S, as well as how civilians can apply the principles that SEALs call upon to forge mental toughness.

Show highlights include:

  • How the military is experimenting with meditation and biofeedback to help soldiers forge mental resilience
  • What your Set Point is and why it’s so important you establish it
  • How to develop situational awareness
  • How and why to develop your intuition
  • The benefits men get in particular from following the Way of the SEAL

And much more!

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »